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Reflective practice

At the heart of fostering children and young people’s numeracy outcomes are reflective practitioners who strive for continuous improvement.

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In all educational settings, at the heart of fostering children and young people’s numeracy outcomes are reflective practitioners who strive for continuous improvement.

Planning cycles assist in identifying areas for improvement, while also highlighting successful practice.

This numeracy guide provides opportunities to explore and reflect upon your practice through each step of your planning cycle.

Reflective prompts are incorporated within the guide to invite and support critical evaluation, reflection and review of practice.

Reflective practice in early years settings

The Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework (VEYLDF) identifies learning and development outcomes to support all professionals who work with children aged 0-8.

The VEYLDF provides eight Practice Principles to guide early childhood professionals to work together, with children and with families to achieve the best outcomes for every child.

The VEYLDF Practice Principles has high expectations for every child Watch the video below to learn about reflective practice and how it occurs at every point in the Early Years Planning Cycle.

In early years’ settings, continuous improvement in numeracy is achieved through reflection throughout the Early Years Planning Cycle which is located within the VEYLDF.

The Early Years Planning Cycle “outlines the process early childhood professionals use in partnership with children, families, kinship members and other professionals to question and analyse, act and reflect on evidence they have collected.

This strengthens the decisions they make about what is important for children and families within their communities.” (VEYLDF, 2016, p. 8)

Reflective Prompt

How are you incorporating the early years planning cycle into your current numeracy planning?

What are your successes? Are there areas for improvement?

How will the practice principles support children’s numeracy development?

Reflective Prompt

How are you incorporating the early years planning cycle into your current numeracy planning?

What are your successes? Are there areas for improvement?

How will the practice principles support children’s numeracy development?

Reflective practice in schools

The teaching and learning cycle outlines five key elements of teaching and learning and provides questions as prompts to assist educators to use student data to identify learning goals, engage in planning, teaching and assessing students’ learning of numeracy.

The  At a glance – Literacy and Numeracy Teacher Resources directs you to the available robust support and resources available from Victorian Department of Education and Training.

This numeracy guide provides opportunities to explore these initiatives and programs, while demonstrating the integration of the four proficiencies into all aspects of your planning, teaching and assessing.

Reflective Prompt

How do you plan to incorporate the four proficiencies (understanding, fluency, problem-solving, and reasoning) into learning in your current educational setting?

What are your successes? Are there areas for improvement?

Reflective Prompt

How do you plan to incorporate the four proficiencies (understanding, fluency, problem-solving, and reasoning) into learning in your current educational setting?

What are your successes? Are there areas for improvement?

Proficiencies

The reciprocal relationship between learning in mathematics and numeracy is demonstrated in learning environments through the proficiencies.

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Proficiencies

The reciprocal relationship between learning in mathematics and numeracy is demonstrated in learning environments through the proficiencies.

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Proficiencies

The reciprocal relationship between learning in mathematics and numeracy is demonstrated in learning environments through the proficiencies.