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Proficiencies

The Victorian Curriculum: Mathematics identifies a reciprocal relationship between learning in mathematics and numeracy. This relationship is demonstrated in learning environments through the proficiencies.

About the proficiencies

The Numeracy Guide supports educators to build capacity and confidence to teach curriculum content and support planning for numeracy while integrating the four proficiencies  – understanding, fluency, problem-solving and reasoning. The proficiencies are woven into the descriptions of each Numeracy Focus and made explicit through the use of language and examples that may be used to develop them. 

For additional information see Learning in Mathematics in the Victorian Curriculum. 

Understanding

refers to students building a robust knowledge of adaptable and transferable mathematical concepts and structures. Students make connections between related concepts and progressively apply the familiar to develop new ideas. They develop an understanding of the relationship between the ‘why’ and the ‘how’ of mathematics.

For example, multiple exposures to location experiences promote an understanding of spatial awareness. Reading books, block play, exploring playgrounds are opportunities to promote understanding.

Click here for more information about multiple exposures to build understanding with young children in the HITS in Numeracy section.

Problem-solving

is the ability of students to make choices, interpret, formulate, model and investigate problem situations, select and use technological functions and communicate solutions effectively.

For example, students gather and represent data to solve a problem raised in class, such as a preferred end of year outing or name for a class pet.

View the range of tasks collated to foster problem-solving on the Resources page.

Fluency

describes students developing skills in choosing appropriate procedures, carrying out procedures flexibly, accurately, efficiently and appropriately, and recalling factual knowledge and concepts readily.

For example, making a reasonable estimate of the number of items in a bowl or the number of people in a stadium.

For more information about supporting fluency across all development levels, see Developing number sense in the Numeracy Focus Areas section.

Reasoning

refers to students developing an increasingly sophisticated capacity for logical, statistical and probabilistic thinking and actions, such as conjecturing, hypothesising, analysing, proving, evaluating, explaining, inferring, justifying, refuting, abstracting and generalising.

For example, asking “W” questions, e.g. when, why, where or what to prompt reasoning. How and if are ‘honorary’ W question starters.

To learn more about how to encourage reasoning see the resources within the Questioning section of the HITS in Numeracy at each development level.

Reflective Prompt

In what ways are you supporting, planning, teaching and assessing the four proficiencies to develop your students’ numeracy?

Challenge yourself by focusing on one or more of the proficiencies as part of your own or your educational settings’ improvement journey.

Reflective Prompt

In what ways are you supporting, planning, teaching and assessing the four proficiencies to develop your students’ numeracy?

Challenge yourself by focusing on one or more of the proficiencies as part of your own or your educational settings’ improvement journey.

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Reflective practice

At the heart of fostering children and young people’s numeracy outcomes are reflective practitioners who strive for continuous improvement.

Reflective practice

At the heart of fostering children and young people’s numeracy outcomes are reflective practitioners who strive for continuous improvement.

Reflective practice

At the heart of fostering children and young people’s numeracy outcomes are reflective practitioners who strive for continuous improvement.

Attention Global2 users: Department-funding for Global2 is being discontinued.

The Department of Education and Training will not be funding the use of Global2 past the end of the current contract on 31st of December 2020.

Please refer to FUSE for further details on the discontinuation of funding and transition options available for schools.